Cascade Program

The Cascade Program is a transitional, center-based program that consists of strength-based therapeutic classrooms dedicated to students who benefit from behavioral supports due to emotional stressors. Within a supportive and collaborative environment, the goal is to equip students with positive coping and behavioral skills so they will succeed academically, in the community and in the workplace.

Using Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) as well as Re-Ed principles, students are provided specially designed instruction in the areas of social, emotional and/or behavioral skills that facilitates reintegration in to their home school communities. Cascade classrooms include increased staffing as well as a part time social worker, who together with the Cascade teacher instructs group during Behavior Self-Management class.

The Cascade Programs are currently located at Ardmore Elementary, Woodridge Elementary, Tillicum Middle School, Bellevue High School, and Sammamish High School.

Coordinator

Kay Gilkey

Evergreen Transition Program

Formerly known as the Transition Services Program, the Evergreen Transition Program (ETP) is a community-based program serving young adults with disabilities, ages 18-21. ETP is located on Interlake High School campus. ETP Students have not yet received their diplomas, though they most likely have participated in their high school graduation ceremony.

Student schedules are individualized and planned by the student, family, and school IEP team. Students in their 3rd year, who are found DDA eligible, participate in the King County’s School-To-Work Program. This program helps students gain supported employment upon graduation (and with DDA funding, keep those supported employment services).

Coordinator

Jennifer Strehle

Visit the Evergreen Transition Program Page

Olympic Program

The Olympic Program is designed to meet the educational needs of students who have significant deficits in the areas of organizational skills, executive functioning skills, and social competency skills that are often associated with autism spectrum disorder. The students in this program are functioning in the low-average to high-average range of intellectual ability.

Using evidence-based practices, the goal is to provide instruction, opportunities for application, knowledge, training and support to maximize independence and enhance students’ opportunities to achieve their full potential. Specially-designed instruction targets goals in the specific qualifying areas as described in each student’s special education evaluation including all academic areas of need. Related services are provided for students who qualify in the areas of motor (OT/PT) and communication (SLP). Students may also need support in the mental health areas of anxiety and depression.

In addition to these special education services, students spend a portion of their day in general education classrooms.

Coordinator

Melissa Gagner

PACIFIC Program

The PACIFIC program is designed to meet the educational needs of students who have significant developmental and intellectual disabilities.

Using evidence-based practices, the goal is to provide instruction in functional skills, opportunities for application, and support to maximize independence and enhance students’ opportunities to achieve their full potential and to live as independently as possible as contributing members of society. The program is designed to provide specially-designed instruction to target goals and objectives in the specific qualifying areas as described in each student’s special education evaluation. Specially-designed instruction addresses the development of skills in the areas of functional academics, adaptive, behavior, social skills, pre-vocational and independent living. Related services are provided for students who qualify in the areas of motor (OT/PT) and communication (SLP), and vision and hearing.

Coordinator

Rebecca Fry

Preschool Age Learning (PALS)

Special education preschool-age programs provide children with special needs, ages three to five (birthday after August 31st), with early intervention services. Program and service options are dependent on each student’s individual needs, as identified in the evaluation and IEP. Options include, but are not limited to, speech/language and or/motor services, itinerant direct and/or consultation services, and specially-designed instruction for cognitive, social and/or adaptive skills.

Coordinator

Elizabeth Toba

Resource Program

The Resource Program is designed to meet the needs of students with disabilities who are eligible for special education services.

Research-based, specially designed instruction, delivered in an individualized or smaller group format, targets goals in the specific qualifying areas as described in each student’s special education evaluation. Related services are provided for students who qualify in the areas of motor (OT/PT) and communication (SLP). Students participate within the general education curriculum to the extent possible as determined by the student’s IEP.

The resource program is available in all schools at the elementary, middle and high school levels.

Assistive Technology

The district supports the use of assistive technology devices, as appropriate, to maximize the accessibility to the general education curriculum by children with disabilities. Assistive technology devices are equipment and systems that are used to increase, maintain or improve functional capability of a child with a disability.

Assistive technology ranges from low-tech to high-tech devices. A low-tech device may be as simple as an adaptive pencil grip. A mid-tech device might be a battery-operated communication device that plays recorded messages. An example of a high-tech device might be a classroom computer with text-to-speech software that gives the struggling reader access the general education curriculum.


Deaf & Hearing Impaired

Due to the wide variation in services often required for students who are deaf or hearing impaired, we do not always have an in-district program to appropriately address every student’s needs. Some students with hearing impairments may be appropriately served in their neighborhood schools, while others may need more specialized services beyond the district’s capacity to deliver. In those cases, services may be provided through a contract with another local school district or outside agency.

Instructional levels (e.g. signing ability, social, communication, and academic skills) and appropriate placement will be identified through the special education evaluation and IEP team consensus. To determine the services needed, an evaluation for special education needs to be completed first.


Occupational & Physical Therapy

Occupational and physical therapists plan, implement, and direct programs for students who have educationally significant fine and gross motor difficulties. In order to receive Occupational and Physical Therapy (OT/PT) services, a student must first be qualified as disabled, and must be eligible to receive special education services. Services are designed to support students in the school setting.

Occupational and physical therapy services include:

  • Evaluating the student’s motor problems.
  • Implementing intervention based on individualized student goals.
  • Assessing progress in achieving goals and objectives.
  • Helping parents understand, prevent, and remediate motor problems.
  • Working with school staff and other professionals to meet the motor needs of children relevant to the educational setting.

Therapy activities are goal-directed, measurable, motivating to the student, and geared toward enabling the student to participate in classroom and school activities. A variety of options are available for the delivery of therapy services. Services may be provided directly by the therapist, or the therapist may consult with classroom staff, who carry out the activities. Therapy may be provided in a group or individually.


Speech/Language Pathology & Audiology

A Speech/Language Pathologist (SLP) plans, implements and directs programs for children who have communication disabilities. In order to receive SLP services, a student must first be qualified as disabled, and must be eligible to receive special education services.

An Educational Audiologist specializes in the prevention, identification, and assessment of hearing impairments.

Speech, Language, and Hearing Services Include:

  • Identifying communication problems through referral and screening.
  • Assessing and diagnosing communicative needs and behaviors.
  • Implementing intervention based on individualized student goals.
  • Reassessing and evaluating progress in achieving goals and objectives.
  • Helping parents understand, prevent, and remediate communication problems.
  • Working with school staff and other professionals to meet the communicative needs of children.

Vision Impairment & Blindness

Students with significant visual impairments are typically serviced in their neighborhood schools with resource assistance. A teacher of the visually impaired supports the team at the school. Services provided include instruction in Braille, alternative technologies, and mobility.