Information Literacy


Students kindergarten through fourth grade spend forty minutes a week in the library with a teacher-librarian. In addition to checking out books, students engage in lessons related to locating, organizing and making sense of information from a variety sources. That may include print or electronic books, magazines, primary sources, maps, data bases, and pre-selected websites. They participate in grade-specific lessons related to digital citizenship, age-specific book award nominees, and genre studies.

Throughout the year, librarians encourage in all students the development of a broad literacy base as well as work on a variety of thinking skills, including but not limited to making claims, finding evidence, drawing conclusions, correcting misconceptions, and connecting ideas. Several lessons are tied to classroom science and social studies units.

The dual purposes of the information literacy curriculum are to insure that students are effective users of ideas and information, and that they develop a life-long disposition to seeking new knowledge through literature or research.

Literacy Curriculum

Journeys

The elementary literacy curriculum in the Bellevue School District is designed to meet the needs of a diverse group of learners by allowing teachers access to a wide range of research based instructional materials. This provides our teachers the flexibility they need to use their professional judgment as they support and extend the learning of each individual student. Through the curriculum, students will achieve the goals of the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts/Literacy and develop the foundations necessary for a successful academic future.

Elementary literacy courses promote skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. Our curriculum encourages connections to the real world and promotes the use of reading and writing in everyday life. In Bellevue, literacy courses require that all students generate and receive information in order to make sense of print and that they actively participate by engaging independently as well as in collaborative settings.

Our curriculum employs a balanced literacy approach and includes instruction in the following areas: phonological and phonemic awareness, phonics/decoding, comprehension, vocabulary, and fluency. This structure provides us with a road map for helping all students achieve and reach beyond the standards. The K-5 Literacy Curricula strive to ensure that students develop literacy competencies as early as possible. With this solid literacy foundation, all students will be able to continue their pursuit of a world class education and the skills needed to be successful in college, career and life.

Math Curriculum

Kindergarten

Math Expressions Common Core

ISBN 9780547824789

In Kindergarten, instructional time should focus on two critical areas: (1) representing and comparing whole numbers, initially with sets of objects; (2) describing shapes and space. More learning time in Kindergarten should be devoted to number than to other topics.


First Grade

Math Expressions Common Core

ISBN 9780547824727

In Grade 1, instructional time should focus on four critical areas: (1) developing understanding of addition, subtraction, and strategies for addition and subtraction within 20; (2) developing understanding of whole number relationships and place value, including grouping in tens and ones; (3) developing understanding of linear measurement and measuring lengths as iterating length units; and (4) reasoning about attributes of, and composing and decomposing geometric shapes.


Second Grade

Math Expressions Common Core

ISBN 9780547824734

In Grade 2, instructional time should focus on four critical areas: (1) extending understanding of base-ten notation; (2) building fluency with addition and subtraction; (3) using standard units of measure; and (4) describing and analyzing shapes.


Third Grade

Math Expressions Common Core

ISBN 9780547824680

In Grade 3, instructional time should focus on four critical areas: (1) developing understanding of multiplication and division and strategies for multiplication and division within 100; (2) developing understanding of fractions, especially unit fractions (fractions with numerator 1); (3) developing understanding of the structure of rectangular arrays and of area; and (4) describing and analyzing two-dimensional shapes.


Fourth Grade

Math Expressions Common Core

ISBN 9780547824697

In Grade 4, instructional time should focus on three critical areas: (1) developing understanding and fluency with multi-digit multiplication, and developing understanding of dividing to find quotients involving multi-digit dividends; (2) developing an understanding of fraction equivalence, addition and subtraction of fractions with like denominators, and multiplication of fractions by whole numbers; (3) understanding that geometric figures can be analyzed and classified based on their properties, such as having parallel sides, perpendicular sides, particular angle measures, and symmetry.


Fifth Grade

Math Expressions Common Core

ISBN 9780547824703

In Grade 5, instructional time should focus on three critical areas: (1) developing fluency with addition and subtraction of fractions, and developing understanding of the multiplication of fractions and of division of fractions in limited cases (unit fractions divided by whole numbers and whole numbers divided by unit fractions); (2) extending division to 2-digit divisors, integrating decimal fractions into the place value system and developing understanding of operations with decimals to hundredths, and developing fluency with whole number and decimal operations; and (3) developing understanding of volume.

Social Emotional Learning


RULER Lesson at Cherry Crest

Social emotional skills are the skills that allow us to understand ourselves and to form healthy relationships with other people.  These skills include the ability to recognize and manage emotions, to take the perspective of others, and to effectively resolve conflicts.  Social emotional skills are developed through the experiences of daily living, and can also be taught and practiced.   Research has shown that acquiring social emotional skills supports academic achievement and prevents risky behaviors.  These competencies serve as a foundation for making responsible decisions that support individual well-being, and more broadly, support healthy communities. Learn more…

Social Studies Curriculum

Kindergarten

Social Studies Alive! Me and My World

ISBN: 978-1-58371-034-0

Social Studies Alive! Me and My World explores the relationships in students’ lives with their families, friends, teachers, and neighbors. Students explore ways to get along with others and how to solve problems. They learn that people live differently in different places and that they can help care for the world. Students practice the lessons they learn in activities such as creating “Who Am I?” books and identifying ways to help reduce waste in the environment.


First Grade

Social Studies Alive! My School and Family

ISBN: 978-1-58371-089-0

Social Studies Alive! My School and Family introduces the structures of schools and families. Students learn how to get along with classmates, follow school rules, and identify people who work at a school. They learn about family traditions and the ways in which family members interact and change. They apply their learning in hands-on activities such as categorizing photographs of family members and acting out the roles of school staff.


Second Grade

Social Studies Alive! My Community

ISBN: 978-1-58371-801-8

In Social Studies Alive! My Community, 2nd graders learn more about the world in which they live. They begin to learn how important it is for people and groups to work together and to peacefully resolve problems. Children’s expanding sense of place and spatial relationships provides readiness for more in-depth geographical studies.


Third Grade

Social Studies Alive! Our Community and Beyond

ISBN: 978-1-58371-826-1

Third grade students will learn about historical and contemporary people who made a difference. Students are introduced to people of various races, cultures, and regions who have made a positive contribution to society. Students have the opportunity at this grade to develop an appreciation for history through factual presentations, autobiographical and biographical studies, and historical fiction.

Geographical investigations begin with the familiar local regions and expand to locations around the world. Students are also introduced to how our economy works, exploring the world of buyers and sellers, supply and demand, and the world of global trade.


Fourth Grade

Fourth Grade Social Studies focuses on the human experience in the geographic region that became the state of Washington. The year consists of lessons from Washington Our Home and two StoryPath units (Early Northwest Coast People and Oregon Trail).

Students will also complete the Washington State Classroom Based Assessment (CBA) entitled People on the Move connected to their study of pioneers traveling to Washington via the Oregon Trail. The fourth grade program is based on the state recommended grade level expectations.


Fifth Grade

Social Studies Alive! America’s Past

ISBN: 978-1-58371-994-7

Fifth grade Social Studies presents the development of the United States from colonial beginnings through the founding of our nation.  This study includes European exploration, Colonial development, the face of slavery, the American Revolution and the basic documents of the United States government, especially the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights, along with the central concepts embedded in democracy.

Students learn about the diverse influences of different people and ethnic groups that shaped early American development. Students will also complete the Washington State Classroom Based Assessment (CBA) entitled You Decide! connected to their study of the stakeholders positions (Loyalist, Patriot, Neutralist, Disenfranchised) held prior to the American Revolution.

Science & STEM Curriculum


The Elementary STEM Initiative has been a multi-year, interdisciplinary effort beginning in the 2013-14 school year. The initiative has been scaled to all 17 elementary schools over a three-year period.  The broad impact of Bellevue’s STEM initiative is a significant feature in that it provides STEM education for all students rather than limit the impact to a single magnet school.

The elementary STEM initiative is focused on:  

  • Strategies to intentionally engage females and students of color in STEM
  • Evidence-based reasoning within science, engineering, math, and literacy
  • Inclusion of students in special education
  • Scaffolding for language learning through the integration of ELL strategies
  • Support for students to be successful in working in teams (collaboration) by applying the tools from the social/emotional learning curriculum

Components of the K-5 STEM Initiative include: 

  • Classrooms across the district are piloting Code.org and other coding courses (e.g. Scratch) to help shape the future of coding experiences for Bellevue students.
  • Two engineering challenges in every grade level
  • Resources to fully support K-5 robotics at every elementary school at no cost to families
  • Support for each elementary school to host a Family Engineering Night for their community
  • Participation by every elementary school in Hour of Code
  • Every elementary summer school class participated in an engineering unit
  • All elementary schools have a 3-D printer and art specialists are receiving professional development in 3D modeling
  • Ongoing professional development to support teachers in implementation of NGSS Science and Engineering Practices, with emphasis on engineering and evidence based reasoning

Kindergarten

In Kindergarten, students investigate three FOSS science units focusing on concepts in life science, earth science, and physical science.

STEM Initiative

In kindergarten science, two engineering design challenges have been added to the kindergarten curriculum replacing content from the FOSS Investigations.

During Wood and Paper, students complete an engineering design challenge titled Move It! Designing Ramps, in which students learn that a force is a push or pull and apply that knowledge to solve a challenge involving ramps.

In Fabric, students engage in an engineering design challenge titled Fabric Shelters in which they design a cover for an outdoor play space in Seattle using their knowledge of fabric properties.

In both engineering design challenges, students apply their understanding of the science unit concepts to solve an engineering problem.


First Grade

In First Grade, students investigate three FOSS science units focusing on concepts in life science, earth science, and physical science.

STEM Initiative

In first grade science, two engineering design challenges from Engineering is Elementary(EiE) have been added to the first grade curriculum replacing content from the FOSS Investigations.

During Air and Weather, students complete an engineering design challenge titled Catching the Wind – Designing Windmills, in which students design and improve wind-powered machines.

In Solids and Liquids, students engage in an engineering design challenge titled A Work in Process in which they design a better process for a playdough recipe.

In both engineering design challenges, students apply their understanding of the science unit concepts to solve an engineering problem.


Second Grade

In Second Grade, students investigate three FOSS science units focusing on concepts in life science, earth science, and physical science.

STEM Initiative

In second grade science, two engineering design challenges from Engineering is Elementary (EiE) have been added to the second grade curriculum replacing content from the FOSS Investigations.

During Balance and Motion, students complete an engineering design challenge titled To Get to the Other Sidein which students apply their understanding of balanced forces to build and test different types of bridges.

In Pebbles, Sand, and Silt, students engage in an engineering design challenge titled A Sticky Situation in which they design a mortar utilizing properties of earth materials to build a rock wall that can withstand varying degrees of force.  In both engineering design challenges, students apply their understanding of the science unit concepts to solve an engineering problem.


Third Grade

In Third Grade, students investigate two FOSS science units focusing on concepts in earth science and physical science.

STEM Initiative

In third grade science, two engineering design challenges one from Engineering is Elementary (EiE) and one embedded in Motion and Matter, have been added to the curriculum.

During one trimester, students complete an engineering design challenge titled A Long Way Down:  Designing Parachutes, in which students apply their understanding of air resistance to design, create, and test a parachute meeting the criteria of the challenge.

In Motion and Matter, students engage in an engineering design challenge applying their knowledge of balanced forces to design, build, and test a model car that will travel the greatest distance.


Fourth Grade

In Fourth Grade, students investigate three FOSS science units focusing on concepts in life science, earth science, and physical science.

STEM Initiative

In fourth grade science, two engineering design challenges from Engineering is Elementary (EiE) have been added to the fourth grade curriculum replacing content from the FOSS Investigations.

During Magnetism and Electricity, students complete an engineering design challenge titled The Attraction is Obvious – Designing MagLev Train Systemsin which students apply their understanding of magnetism to design, build and test a maglev train system.

In Structures of Life, students engage in an engineering design challenge titled Just Passing Through – Designing Model Membranes in which they study properties of membranes and design a membrane to regulate water in a frog’s habitat.

In both engineering design challenges, students apply their understanding of the science unit concepts to solve an engineering problem.


Fifth Grade

In Fifth Grade, students investigate two FOSS science units focusing on concepts in earth science and physical science.

STEM Initiative

The fifth grade science curriculum has been enriched through the addition of  two engineering design challenges. During the life science trimester, students complete an engineering design challenge titled A Slick Solution: Cleaning an Oil Spill, in which they design, create, and test cleanup methods to minimize the impact of oil spills on the ecosystem. In the same trimester, students apply their knowledge of ecosystem dynamics by completing algae investigations in which they explore factors that influence algae growth.

They also explore the impact of algae growth on the Puget Sound Ecosystem. During the earth science trimester, students complete the redesigned FOSS Landforms unit titled The Skokomish River Challenge.  In this unit, students engage in an engineering design challenge applying their knowledge of erosion and deposition to design, build, and test an erosion mitigation solution.

World Language

Lion Dance at Jing Mei

The Bellevue School District recommends that all students study a World Language to prepare for college, career and life.  Bellevue World Language courses equip students with the skills to communicate effectively across multiple cultures. Students use the World Language to explore global challenges and analyze possible solutions. The Bellevue School offers the following world language programs at the elementary level: